Core and Back Home Exercise

Test and Train your Back Motion, Core Stability and Strength from Home.

EXERCISE 1: PELVIC TILT CHALLENGE:

This video demonstrates putting on the Trunk Patient Pack and performing pelvic mobility exercises in the standing position. The goal here is to start to learn how you can control pelvic motion in standing: this may be very valuable for persons with back pain, as it gives you other options in how your back might be "loaded" or stressed, when standing in line for instance. Adding some variability to your spine position throughout the day will offer a back that is sensitive some change in the forces it is experiencing, and you can use this to your advantage!

We recommend practicing this on the flag for 1-2 minutes, 1-2x per day and increasing your range as able. Remember, the goal is to isolate movement from your pelvis, so keep your shoulders still (don't rock the shoulders back and forth to move the laser, try to keep everything still except for your waist line- another way to think of the movement is to "shine your belt buckle upward, then downward".

Consult a healthcare provider prior to performing exercise to determine which exercises are appropriate for you. This video is for educational purposes only.

 

EXERCISE 2: BALANCE CHALLENGES:

This video demonstrates putting on the Trunk Patient Pack and performing balance exercises in the standing position, as part of a home exercise routine. The goal here is to start to learn how stable your trunk is in different positions, and how much sway you have when you try to perform standard balance exercises. This video is just an example, you can get creative here. In general, if balance is one of your goals, you could work on whatever progression you find challenging (but can perform safely) for 5 minutes daily.

***USE SKI POLES in each hand if you are unstable, so you can touch them to the ground if needed, or perform with a partner who can stabilize you when needed.

Options might include:

Standing with Feet Together (Beginner): Keep the laser centered, 10 second holds with your ankles together, then rest by spreading feet apart for a wider base of support. Repeat 10 times. PROGRESS by rotating the head slowly left and right, then speed up head rotation speed to make even harder: this will throw off your balance a bit. You can also reach your arm out in different positions. You can also stand on softer surfaces like a large folded bath towel or couch cushion.

Single Leg Stance: Keep the laser centered, 10 second holds 10 times on each leg. PROGRESS by rotating the head slowly left and right, then speed up head rotation speed to make even harder: this will throw off your balance a bit.You can also stand on softer surfaces like a large folded bath towel or couch cushion.

Tandem Stance: Keep the laser centered, 10 second holds, 10 times with right leg forward, 10 times with left leg forward. PROGRESS by rotating the head slowly left and right, then speed up head rotation speed to make even harder: this will throw off your balance a bit. You can also stand on softer surfaces like a large folded bath towel or couch cushion.

Balance with Movement (Advanced): In this exercise you can get creative: stand on one leg, then try to move your body by hinging at the hips, to move the laser slowly up and down, left and right. You can dial out numbers on the clock, clockwise and counter-clockwise 10 times, or aim at whatever targets you wish: the goal is to stay in control.

 

Consult a healthcare provider prior to performing exercise to determine which exercises are appropriate for you. This video is for educational purposes only.

 

EXERCISE 3: "BIRD DOG" MOTOR CONTROL CHALLENGE:

This video demonstrates back exercises in the "hands and knees" position, with visual feedback from the laser to show you how you are moving your pelvis during a "Bird Dog" exercise for stability. If your stomach is in the way and you cannot get accurate movement of the laser, just affix the laser to the side of the hip, and aim it projecting outward (see other videos of Eric performing core exercises laying on his back, this set-up is used here as well).

Exercise 1: Bird Dog: first get on all 4's and adjust the laser so it is in the center of the flag. Start your back in a neutral position (not arched in either direction). Reach one arm out, and your opposite leg out, and try to keep the laser STILL. Hold for 5-15 seconds, depending on ability, alternating arm and leg position.

Exercise 2: Bird Dog with Movement: first get on all 4's and adjust the laser so it is in the center of the flag. Start your back in a neutral position (not arched in either direction). Reach one arm out, and your opposite leg out, and try to keep the laser STILL. Next, controlling the motion with the hip that has the knee touching the floor, as well as your hand that is on the ground, try to move around. You will notice that you can allow your hip to drop and elevate, as well as move your pelvis in a "cat" or "cow" position- practice dialing numbers of the clock, with the goal of getting fatigue while staying in control of desired directional movement.

 

Consult a healthcare provider prior to performing exercise to determine which exercises are appropriate for you. This video is for educational purposes only.

 

EXERCISE 4: LUMBO-PELVIC MOVEMENT AND CORE PROGRESSIONS:  

This video describes how to use the MotionGuidance® Head/Trunk Patient Pack to perform back and core exercise with visual feedback for performance. In the Intro, we show you where to mount the laser for best feedback, and these progressions are performed on the floor, with the laser projected at the ceiling.

Exercise 1: Lumbo-Pelvic Movement: This simple exercise allows you to visualize your ability to move your back. Also known as a "pelvic tilt", as you "tuck your tail" or flatten your back, you should see the laser move UP. As you arch your back and create a hollow space between the floor and your back, the laser will more DOWN. You can visualize your full ability to move in either direction. Spend 1-2 minutes rocking fully up, and down.

Core Progression 1: in this exercise, the goal is to keep the laser STILL on the ceiling, after you have your back in "set position" (neutral or slight posterior pelvic tilt gently flattening the back out). The goal is to march one leg up and down, and repeat on the other leg, keeping the laser still. Practice for 1-2 minutes. If you loose control of keeping the laser still, stop and try again.

Core Progression 2: in this exercise, we can progress by lifting the legs in an "up-up, down-down" fashion. You will notice as you lift that second leg and have both feet in the air, that is where you are going to need core support to keep the laser still. Practice for 1-2 minutes. If you loose control of keeping the laser still, stop and try again. You can progress further by then "kicking outward" with your feet- as the weight of your leg transfers further away from your body, this will require more core demand to not pull the pelvis into an arch, or anterior pelvic tilt position.

Core Progression 3: This exercise works on posterior leg and back stability: the goal is to bridge up, then elevate one leg, without the laser dropping right or left- your aim is to keep the laser centered. You may notice when one leg is in the air, your body has a much harder time controlling the stability on the leg that is touching the ground- practice this! Alternate holding 5-15 seconds depending on ability.

Core Progression 4: This exercise works on posterior leg and back stability but adds a component of movement. The goal is to bridge up, then elevate one leg, without the laser dropping right or left- your aim is to keep the laser centered first, and then rotating your trunk left and right in a CONTROLLED fashion (slow), you will now see the laser move left and right. You may notice one side is much harder than the other side- practice this! Practice these slow movements starting small and slow, the goal here is muscle fatigue. You can perform 3-4 bouts to good fatigue on each side, or more depending on your ability.

 

Consult a healthcare provider prior to performing exercise to determine which exercises are appropriate for you. This video is for educational purposes only.