").appendTo("body"); });

how you can enhance your lumbar and pelvic patient outcomes using visual feedback :

 
 

Give standard lumbo-pelvic stabilization exercise a visual component with the Motion Guidance tool, and allow instant recognition of compensatory lumbar extension, or pelvic rotation. The direct visual feedback allows a much more sensitive screening and training mechanism, and gives your patient a cue that transends verbal and tactile cues for an area that many patients struggle with their kinesthetic awareness. Plus, it makes training fun.

I use Motion Guidance for many patients to teach motor control, single leg stance stability, and general movement awareness. It is limited only by your imagination! It’s a great product and I recommend it to any clinician, PT, OT, DC, ATC, or anyone giving or instructing corrective exercises.

— Dr. Erson Religioso III DPT, MS, MTC, CertMDT, CFC, CSCS, FMS, FMT, FAAOMPT

watch a 15 minute tutorial on quadruped progressions:

-Eric Dinkins, PT, MSPT, OCS, Cert. MT, MCTA

Here are a few ways enhance core rehab with visual feedback:

Thoracic and Lumbar Rotation Dissociation: moving from upper body while isolating pelvis:

  • This exercise takes a look at your patient's ability to dissociate movements of the upper body from the pelvis, moving from the upper body while isolating the lower body. Body awareness can be inhibited in persons with pain, so this exercise may be more challenging than it looks!

Lumbar Rotation Dissociation: moving from lower body while isolating sternum:

  • This exercise takes a look at your patient's ability to dissociate movements of the upper body from the pelvis, moving from the lower body while isolating upper body. Body awareness can be inhibited in persons with pain, so this exercise may be more challenging than it looks!

Thoracic Rotation ROM in Quadruped:

  • This exercise takes adds a visual to thoracic rotation to encourage full ROM and quantify gains in ROM within the exercise session. Track the laser up on a wall, or across the floor and encourage your patient verbally to "move the laser further."

Adding Laser Visual Feeback to Assessment and Common Exercise:

The patient can position the large belt and perpendicular mount either around the mid waist for global hip and lumbar motion, or more specifically around the ASIS for lumbo-pelvic motion and tilting. This will allow your patient to visualize their body awareness, and practice movement control during exercise! 


Lumbar Pelvic Tilts in Standing:

The patient stands wearing the large strap at waist level around bilateral ASIS, and the perpendicular mount is at the center of the body. The patient practices posterior and anterior pelvic tilts, tracking the laser up and down, respectively. This is an excellent body awareness exercise.


Lumbar Pelvic Tilts in Quadruped:

The patient is in quadruped on the tracking grid wearing the large strap at waist level around bilateral ASIS, and the perpendicular mount is at the center of the body. The laser can be adjusted to aim central. The patient practices posterior and anterior pelvic tilts, tracking the laser up and down, respectively. This is an excellent body awareness exercise.


Lumbar Core Stability in Quadruped:

The patient is in quadruped on the tracking grid wearing the large strap at waist level around bilateral ASIS, and the perpendicular mount is at the center of the body. The laser can be adjusted to aim central. The patient can then practice leg extensions, and arm extensions, or both (bird-dog) positions, noting the amount of trunk deviation or pelvic tilt.  


We are constantly increasing our database of visual assisted exercise. Send us your ideas on social media!