").appendTo("body"); });

how you can enhance your knee patient outcomes using visual feedback :

The Motion Guidance tool is the perfect visual cue for assisting your patient with lower extremity motor control deficit resulting in knee valgus. The eccentric component of tracking within a line promotes challenging neuromuscular control of the gluteal and quad muscles, and adds a edge to body awareness with a simple functional task. The visual feedback can be used to assess a simple squat, single leg squat, step down, or dynamic landing pattern to instantly alert both the clinician and the patient of a biomechanical deficit. Give your clinic the most simple, cost effective biomechanics lab available, and allow your patient to train at home with Motion Guidance HEP Patient Packs.

I have mostly been using the kit for movement retraining of squatting, planting and jumping... the laser guide really helps athletes to see their errant mechanics and to correct them- much more than with a mirror or video like I typically use. I actually have a patient (s/p ACL recon) who drives to see me from out of state... I dont see him very often due to the distance. Anyway, we have been doing a lot of movement re-training so last week I used the MG system with him. He was so excited because he finally “got” the right movement pattern with his single leg squats- he actually asked if he could add-on another appointment with me this week!

— Carol Ferkovic, PT.

watch a 13 minute tutorial on using visual feedback with squat and lower chain progressions:

Eric Dinkins, PT, MSPT, OCS, Cert. MT, MCTA

Some tips for using Motion Guidance laser visual feedback for squat assessment and training

Here are some ways to enhance lower-chain dynamic loading with visual feedback:

Terminal Knee Extension:

The patient can stand with the affected leg's toe aligned with the the arrow line on the tracking grid, wearing the small strap and parallel mount 2" above the patella. The patient is instructed to straighten their knee fully, and the laser is then adjusted to their laces, or to the toe: the patient is then instructed to repeatedly flex and straighten their knee, while trying to move the laser further up their laces. This is an excellent exercise for any patient lacking full knee extension.


Double Leg Squat: 

Lock in squat mechanics with Motion Guidance: the laser feedback is an excellent cue to avoid "knee over toe" or high anterior tibial shearing force. As the patient transfers weight to their heels and performs a proper hip hinge, the laser will track a much further trajectory. The patient can stand with the affected leg's toe aligned with the center line, wearing the small strap and parallel mount 2" above the patella. 


Multidirectional LE reaches: 

Add Motion Guidance laser visuals to tests and motions similar to "Y-Balance Test", and qualify hip position during the exercise! 

Double Leg Squat, uninvolved leg unloaded:

The patient can stand with the affected leg's toe aligned with the center line, wearing the small strap and parallel mount 2" above the patella. The opposite foot is on a foam pad, to bias the involved side. This is a simple progression from a regular squat. The patient can watch the laser track the center line, aiming for controlled motion. 


Step Up:

The patient is wearing the small strap and parallel mount 2" above the patella, with the affected leg atop a step, the laser is adjusted to aligned with the center line on the tracking grid. Adjust the laser so it is centered in the bullseye of the tracking grid. As the patient steps up and extends their knee, the laser should track backward along the center line: any deviation will be noted, as the patient is aiming for smooth controlled motion. 


Step Down:

The patient is wearing the small strap and parallel mount 2" above the patella, standing atop the step: the laser is adjusted to aligned with the center line on the tracking grid.  As the patient steps down, the laser should track along the center line: any deviation will be noted, as the patient is aiming for smooth controlled motion.


Single leg squat:

The patient is wearing the small strap and parallel mount 2" above the patella. The patient stands on single leg, with the affected to aligned with the center line on the tracking grid. The laser is adjusted to project a few feet out from the patient, to allow exaggerated tracking visualization as the patient squats. The patient performs a single leg squat, attempting to stay in the center line. The patient is aiming for smooth controlled motion.


Single Leg Squat on Foam:

The patient is wearing the small strap and parallel mount 2" above the patella. The patient stands on single leg on a foam pad, with the affected to aligned with the center line on the tracking grid. The laser is adjusted to project a few feet out from the patient, to allow exaggerated tracking visualization as the patient squats. The patient performs a single leg squat, attempting to stay in the center line. The patient is aiming for smooth controlled motion.


Single Leg Squat: Varus-Valgus Reversals

The patient is wearing the small strap and parallel mount 2" above the patella. The patient stands on single leg with the affected to aligned with the center line on the tracking grid. The laser is adjusted to project a few feet out from the patient, to allow exaggerated tracking visualization as the patient squats. The patient performs a single leg squat to the horizontal arrow on the grid, then slowly tracks laterally and medially, then returns. This is an advanced exercise and only to be utilized once the patient has proper motor control in single leg squats.


Lateral Band Steps:

The patient is wearing the small strap and parallel mount 2" above the patella. The patient has a resistance band between the ankles, and stands in squat stance at the side of the tracking grid. The patient takes large lateral steps, tracing the laser towards the end target, and returns


Knee Flexion Compensation Awareness:

The patient is wearing the small strap and parallel mount 2" above the patella, with the contralateral leg on a step as shown in the video (step is optional). The patient bends their affected knee into full flexion, any compensatory hip flexion will be noted by the laser, as the patient attempts to keep it static.


We are constantly increasing our database of visual assisted exercise. Send us your ideas on social media!